WEBVTT 00:00:00.228 --> 00:00:04.395 (soft whimsical music) (quiet pattering) 00:00:05.893 --> 00:00:07.612 - [Narrator] In Hollywood, everything is magic 00:00:07.612 --> 00:00:08.910 and make-believe... 00:00:08.910 --> 00:00:11.445 - [Woman] Gloves with paper clips are dog paws. 00:00:11.445 --> 00:00:12.692 - [Narrator] Even what you hear. 00:00:12.692 --> 00:00:14.817 - We are storytellers with sound. 00:00:14.817 --> 00:00:16.763 Over here we have a feather duster 00:00:16.763 --> 00:00:18.096 we use for bird-- (feathers fluttering) 00:00:18.096 --> 00:00:19.446 bird wings. 00:00:19.446 --> 00:00:21.450 We bring sound into the story, 00:00:21.450 --> 00:00:25.329 and we can create any mood with that sound. 00:00:25.329 --> 00:00:27.129 - [Narrator] When you watch a film, 00:00:27.129 --> 00:00:29.009 much of what you're hearing was created... 00:00:29.009 --> 00:00:30.669 (feet tromping heavily) 00:00:30.669 --> 00:00:33.257 From footsteps on a snowy path 00:00:33.257 --> 00:00:34.469 to a vicious thunderstorm. 00:00:34.469 --> 00:00:35.427 (leaves rustling) 00:00:35.427 --> 00:00:36.514 (thunder booming) 00:00:36.514 --> 00:00:39.972 - [Woman] Weather is a really interesting thing to recreate. 00:00:39.972 --> 00:00:41.510 - They make it exciting. (chuckles) 00:00:41.510 --> 00:00:44.221 - [Woman] It depends on the elements that we're using, 00:00:44.221 --> 00:00:46.560 and how it's filmed, and what they wanna hear. 00:00:46.560 --> 00:00:48.178 - [Narrator] Here at the Warner Brothers' lot, 00:00:48.178 --> 00:00:50.598 Foley artists practice their craft; 00:00:50.598 --> 00:00:52.527 and if they do their jobs right, 00:00:52.527 --> 00:00:54.157 you won't even notice. 00:00:54.157 --> 00:00:56.656 - [Woman] People take sound for granted, 00:00:56.656 --> 00:00:58.988 but you would miss it if it wasn't there. 00:00:58.988 --> 00:01:01.655 (bag crunching) 00:01:03.199 --> 00:01:06.256 (pensive music) 00:01:06.256 --> 00:01:09.250 (cloth fluttering) - Foley is the art of sound. 00:01:09.250 --> 00:01:13.417 It's creating sounds in sync with what's happening onscreen. 00:01:14.706 --> 00:01:18.260 The art of Foley goes back to the old radio days, 00:01:18.260 --> 00:01:20.383 where you would see the sound guys 00:01:20.383 --> 00:01:22.430 with their clomping with their coconuts. 00:01:22.430 --> 00:01:24.222 This is what we use for horse hooves. 00:01:24.222 --> 00:01:27.059 They're plungers, and we stuff them 00:01:27.059 --> 00:01:29.848 with cloth and a little tape; 00:01:29.848 --> 00:01:30.811 and here we go. 00:01:30.811 --> 00:01:33.443 (muffled clopping) 00:01:33.443 --> 00:01:35.237 Jack Foley came in and he thought, 00:01:35.237 --> 00:01:39.154 "If I do those sounds in sync with the picture, 00:01:39.991 --> 00:01:42.405 "I've just taken a whole step out." 00:01:42.405 --> 00:01:43.949 - [Narrator] Jack Foley's legacy in sound 00:01:43.949 --> 00:01:47.957 began in the 1920s, as talkies swept Hollywood. 00:01:47.957 --> 00:01:50.916 Ever since, the reproduction of sound effects 00:01:50.916 --> 00:01:53.374 added to film in post-production 00:01:53.374 --> 00:01:55.703 is called the art of Foley. 00:01:55.703 --> 00:01:58.632 - The Foley stage consists of different surfaces. 00:01:58.632 --> 00:02:00.925 - This is walking on leaves, or in a forest. 00:02:00.925 --> 00:02:02.298 (shoes clomping) 00:02:02.298 --> 00:02:05.631 (hissing and pattering) 00:02:06.810 --> 00:02:11.183 For snow, what we normally use is regular play sand. 00:02:11.183 --> 00:02:13.272 And then to add to that, 00:02:13.272 --> 00:02:16.105 sometimes you hear that familiar crunch... 00:02:16.105 --> 00:02:19.606 Which, we use cornstarch. (bag crunches) 00:02:19.606 --> 00:02:23.236 Your ear hears snow; but in actuality, it's sand. 00:02:23.236 --> 00:02:26.153 (footsteps crunch) 00:02:29.622 --> 00:02:32.000 (solemn music) 00:02:32.000 --> 00:02:34.114 - It's almost like a prop house. 00:02:34.114 --> 00:02:36.749 We have collected different things, 00:02:36.749 --> 00:02:39.176 because everything here should make a sound. 00:02:39.176 --> 00:02:42.058 Here's a classic squeaky hinge. (metal squeaks) 00:02:42.058 --> 00:02:46.505 Pinecones can be used for cracking ice. (faint crackling) 00:02:46.505 --> 00:02:49.354 - You have the three people that are on the stage, 00:02:49.354 --> 00:02:51.955 the mixer and the two Foley artists, which-- 00:02:51.955 --> 00:02:55.905 It's important that you have a team that's cohesive. 00:02:55.905 --> 00:02:57.433 - [Red Shirt] Y'know, somethin's cracking, popping. 00:02:57.433 --> 00:02:58.957 I don't know what it is. 00:02:58.957 --> 00:03:01.196 - [Man] Is it this? (leaves rustling) 00:03:01.196 --> 00:03:03.952 Sometimes it takes a little trial and error 00:03:03.952 --> 00:03:05.637 to see what works best. 00:03:05.637 --> 00:03:06.470 Hold on. 00:03:06.470 --> 00:03:09.573 - We have a streamer that goes across the screen, 00:03:09.573 --> 00:03:11.997 and when the streamer gets to the end, 00:03:11.997 --> 00:03:15.003 that tells us when that sound should start. 00:03:15.003 --> 00:03:17.132 (rustling) 00:03:17.132 --> 00:03:19.228 It's an interesting dance. 00:03:19.228 --> 00:03:20.803 There's really nothing 00:03:20.803 --> 00:03:24.136 that we can't do here, imagination-wise. 00:03:25.671 --> 00:03:27.593 - Right now, we're in the control room, 00:03:27.593 --> 00:03:28.809 and it's where I mix; 00:03:28.809 --> 00:03:33.376 and I listen to them performing to the picture. 00:03:33.376 --> 00:03:35.307 I try not to look at them, 00:03:35.307 --> 00:03:37.178 because I really don't wanna see what they're using. 00:03:37.178 --> 00:03:39.113 I wanna see how it sounds. 00:03:39.113 --> 00:03:41.951 (playful music) 00:03:41.951 --> 00:03:44.868 (thunder crackles) 00:03:45.990 --> 00:03:49.914 - All sound is two elements hitting one another. 00:03:49.914 --> 00:03:52.459 - With rain, if it's hitting a puddle, 00:03:52.459 --> 00:03:54.830 or if it's hitting someone's face, 00:03:54.830 --> 00:03:57.709 that's all gonna sound different; 00:03:57.709 --> 00:04:00.215 so those are very specific little things 00:04:00.215 --> 00:04:03.048 that we have to watch and look at. 00:04:04.021 --> 00:04:04.974 Okay, Mary Jo. 00:04:04.974 --> 00:04:07.423 - [Mary Jo] Here we go. 00:04:07.423 --> 00:04:10.340 (liquid pattering) 00:04:17.188 --> 00:04:20.521 (high-pitched chirping) 00:04:22.787 --> 00:04:25.065 (distant thunder) 00:04:25.065 --> 00:04:26.776 - Wind is interesting because 00:04:26.776 --> 00:04:29.861 it's usually what the wind is blowing through. 00:04:29.861 --> 00:04:33.789 - Alice is gonna use the Batman cape to create the sails, 00:04:33.789 --> 00:04:35.654 and I'm going to create the boat 00:04:35.654 --> 00:04:37.745 actually going through the water. 00:04:37.745 --> 00:04:38.995 Okay, let's go. 00:04:40.549 --> 00:04:44.798 (fabric fluttering) (water splashing) 00:04:44.798 --> 00:04:48.473 - If we're doing a boat going through waves, 00:04:48.473 --> 00:04:50.437 we would use the big tub that we have 00:04:50.437 --> 00:04:52.687 to get that slapping sound, 00:04:53.771 --> 00:04:57.938 or churning up the water a lot in the tub with our hands. 00:04:59.108 --> 00:05:00.531 It's a lot of sound, like-- 00:05:00.531 --> 00:05:03.826 Like a lot of things artistic, is very subjective; 00:05:03.826 --> 00:05:06.858 so, I have to make that judgment call. 00:05:06.858 --> 00:05:10.069 There's a great moment when you get the perfect sound; 00:05:10.069 --> 00:05:12.488 and they don't always know it, but I do. 00:05:12.488 --> 00:05:13.620 - How was that, Mary Jo? 00:05:13.620 --> 00:05:14.741 - [Mary Jo] Sounded great. 00:05:14.741 --> 00:05:17.712 - When there are multiple weather elements involved, 00:05:17.712 --> 00:05:21.504 we might do all the specific things first, 00:05:21.504 --> 00:05:24.626 and then go back and do maybe a general sound. 00:05:24.626 --> 00:05:28.965 We have a shot here of a hiker coming down the waterfall, 00:05:28.965 --> 00:05:33.182 so I'm doing the sound of the carabiner and his rope, 00:05:33.182 --> 00:05:37.349 and his equipment. (metal squeaks) 00:05:40.484 --> 00:05:41.317 How was that? 00:05:41.317 --> 00:05:42.150 - [Mary Jo] That was cool. 00:05:42.150 --> 00:05:42.983 - Great. 00:05:42.983 --> 00:05:45.733 (water sloshing) 00:05:46.731 --> 00:05:49.731 (water splattering) 00:05:51.025 --> 00:05:52.991 - So, I'm gonna play it back all together, 00:05:52.991 --> 00:05:55.093 and see what we've got. (keyboard clacking) 00:05:55.093 --> 00:05:59.371 (water splashing) (metal squeaking) 00:05:59.371 --> 00:06:01.834 - We really layer everything 00:06:01.834 --> 00:06:04.960 so the mixers can mix how they wanna hear it; 00:06:04.960 --> 00:06:09.544 and we do things also that are a little over the top, 00:06:09.544 --> 00:06:13.711 because we have to fight with music, sometimes dialogue, 00:06:15.345 --> 00:06:17.225 but hopefully when you hear it at home, 00:06:17.225 --> 00:06:20.224 it'll sound just like it should be natural. 00:06:20.224 --> 00:06:24.391 (water splashing) (metal squeaking) 00:06:27.447 --> 00:06:30.280 (electronic beep)